Transportation Asset Management

Photo by   Craig Adderley   from   Pexels

Photo by Craig Adderley from Pexels

The Core Principles of Asset Management

  • Policy-driven-Resource allocation decisions are based on a well-defined set of policy goals and objectives.

  • Performance-based-Policy objectives are translated into system performance measures that are used for both day-to-day and strategic management.

  • Analysis of Options and Tradeoffs-Decisions on how to allocate funds within and across different types of investments (e.g., preventive maintenance versus rehabilitation, pavements versus bridges) are based on an analysis of how different allocations will impact achievement of relevant policy objectives.

  • Decisions Based on Quality Information-The merits of different options with respect to an agency's policy goals are evaluated using credible and current data.

  • Monitoring Provides Clear Accountability and Feedback-Performance results are monitored and reported for both impacts and effectiveness.

Adapted from NCHRP Report 551, Performance Measures and Targets for Transportation Asset Management, Vol. I, Research Report, 2006, p. ii.

Definition

Transportation Asset Management is a strategic and systematic process of operating, maintaining, upgrading, and expanding physical assets effectively throughout their lifecycle. It focuses on business and engineering practices for resource allocation and utilization, with the objective of better decision making based upon quality information and well defined objectives.2

Transportation Asset Management is a strategic and systematic process of operating, maintaining, upgrading, and expanding physical assets effectively throughout their lifecycle.
MATS Pavement Condition Trends 2010-2018

MATS Pavement Condition Trends 2010-2018

State of Michigan Pavement Condition Trends 2010-2018

State of Michigan Pavement Condition Trends 2010-2018

Annual PASER Road Ratings

The Pavement Surface and Evaluation Rating (PASER) system was developed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Transportation Information Center to be used as the State of Wisconsin’s standard road rating system. PASER is a “windshield” road rating system that uses a 1 to 10 rating scale, with a value of 10 representing a new road and a value of 1 representing a failed road. Condition ratings are assigned by monitoring the type and amount of visual defects along a road segment while driving the segment. The PASER system interprets these observations into a condition rating. It provides a way to compare roads within a community and suggests the type of maintenance that may be warranted. Most pavements will deteriorate through various phases as shown. The rate at which pavement deteriorates from an excellent (10) to a very poor condition (1) depends largely on its environment, traffic loading conditions, original construction quality, and interim maintenance procedures. Two pavements constructed at the same time may have significantly different lives, or certain portions of a pavement may deteriorate more rapidly than others, due to material or construction problems.

The State of Michigan Transportation Asset Management Council requested that the information gathered in the federal aid road surveys be reported using the following categories:

See interactive maps of this data on this site, and compare other areas on the TAMC mapping site.

Michigan’s 2018 Roads & Bridges Annual Report

The Michigan Transportation Asset Management Council (TAMC) has released the Michigan 2018 Annual Road and Bridge Report to the Michigan Legislature

During 2018, the TAMC rated the pavement condition of the paved federal-aid eligible roads for the fourteenth consecutive year. "The report reveals further deterioration of Michigan’s federal aid eligible roads as there are more miles rated as poor than fair", stated Johnson. The 2018 condition data indicates 41% of these roads are in poor condition, 38% are in fair condition, and 21% are in good condition; in 2017, the breakdown was 40% poor, 40% fair, and 20% good.

The report also includes data on the condition of all bridges in Michigan. An analysis of the bridge condition data indicates that bridge owners are “losing ground” due to an aging inventory and rising costs for repair and replacement. This year’s report reveals Michigan has 10.7% of bridges rated as “structurally deficient.”

The 2018 Annual Road and Bridge Report can be viewed, along with other past reports, at www.Michigan.gov/TAMC. This effort was achieved through a cooperative effort of individuals from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT), city and village and county road agencies, in coordination with regional planning agencies, and metropolitan planning organizations.

Graphic courtesy Barry County Road Commission  https://www.barrycrc.org/what-do-we-do/engineering/paser/

Graphic courtesy Barry County Road Commission https://www.barrycrc.org/what-do-we-do/engineering/paser/

 

Condition and Cost

The Barry County Road Commission, on their website, states the following:

Roads with PASER ratings of 8 – 10 require Routine Maintenance.  Routine maintenance is the day-to-day maintenance activities that are scheduled, such as street sweeping, drainage clearing, shoulder gravel grading, and sealing cracks to prevent standing water and water penetration.

Roads with PASER ratings of 5 – 7 require Capital Preventive Maintenance.  Capital preventive maintenance is a planned set of cost effective treatments to an existing roadway system and its appurtenances that preserves, retards future deterioration and maintains or improves the functional condition of the system without significantly increasing structural capacity.  The purpose of capital preventive maintenance fixes is to protect the pavement structures, slow the rate of pavement deterioration and/or correct pavement surface deficiencies.  Surface treatments are targeted at pavement surface defects primarily caused by the environment and by pavement material deficiencies.

Roads with PASER ratings of 1- 4 require Structural Improvements.  This category includes work identified as rehabilitation and reconstruction which address the structural integrity of a road.

Asset Management Council

Public Act 499 of 2002 established a ten member Transportation Asset Management Council.  The Council is comprised of members from the Michigan Department of Transportation, the County Road Association of Michigan, the Michigan Municipal League, the Michigan Association of Regions, the Michigan Association of Counties, and the Michigan Townships Association.  According to the Act, the mission of the Council is to: “Advise the State Transportation Commission on a statewide asset management strategy and the necessary procedures and analytical tools to implement such a strategy on Michigan’s highway system in a cost-effective, efficient manner.”

The law requires the council to set up a process for determining the condition of Michigan’s highways and bridges(PASER) and to develop a strategy so that those assets are maintained, preserved and improved in an efficient and cost-effective manner. PASER allows the state government to determine the funding needs of all of the federal aide eligible roads in the state of Michigan.

Some information on this page is borrowed from the Transportation Asset Management Council website, click here for more.

Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating (PASER)

The PASER scale is a 1-10 rating system for road pavement condition developed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Transportation Information Center. PASER uses visual inspection to evaluate pavement surface conditions. When assessed correctly, PASER ratings provide a basis for comparing the quality of roadway segments.[1] The PASER assessment method does not require measurements of individual distresses, and thus PASER ratings cannot be disaggregated into measurements of specific distress types. The advantage to this method is that roads may be assessed quickly, possibly even by "windshield survey." A primary disadvantage is that because PASER ratings cannot be disaggregated into component distress data, the metric cannot be used in mechanistic-empirical transportation asset management programs.[2]

Numerical PASER ratings are translatable to condition categories and prescribed treatment options, as shown below.

The Michigan Transportation Asset Management Council has selected the PASER rating system as the statewide standard of pavement condition reporting.[3]

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